Development of Glaucoma Animation, Open Angle vs Angle Closure Glaucoma.


Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases in which
the optic nerve is damaged leading to irreversible loss of vision. In most cases, this damage
is due to an increased pressure within the eye.
The eye produces a fluid called aqueous humor which is secreted by the ciliary body into
the posterior chamber – a space between the iris and the lens. It then flows through the
pupil into the anterior chamber between the iris and the cornea. From here, it drains
through a sponge-like structure located at the base of the iris called the trabecular
meshwork and leaves the eye. In a healthy eye, the rate of secretion balances the rate
of drainage. In people with glaucoma, the drainage canal
is partially or completely blocked. Fluid builds up in the chambers and this increases
pressure within the eye. The pressure drives the lens back and presses on the vitreous
body which in turn compresses and damages the blood vessels and nerve fibers running
at the back of the eye. These damaged nerve fibers result in patches of vision loss, and
if left untreated, may lead to total blindness. There are two main types of glaucoma: open-angle
and angle-closure. Open-angle glaucoma , or chronic glaucoma,
is caused by partial blockage of the drainage canal. The angle between the cornea and the
iris is “open”, meaning the entrance to the drain is clear, but the flow of aqueous humor
is somewhat slow. The pressure builds up gradually in the eye over a long period of time. Symptoms
appear gradually, starting from peripheral vision loss, and may go on unnoticed until
the central vision is affected. Progression of glaucoma can be stopped with medical treatments,
but part of vision that is already lost can not be restored. This is why it’s very important
to detect signs of glaucoma early with regular eye exams.
Angle-closure glaucoma, or acute glaucoma, is caused by a sudden and complete blockage
of aqueous humor drainage. The pressure within the eye rises rapidly and may lead to total
vision loss quickly. Certain anatomical features of the eye such as narrow drainage angle,
shallow anterior chamber, thin and droopy iris, make it easier to develop acute glaucoma.
Typically, this happens when the pupil is dilated and the lens is stuck to the back
of the iris. This prevents the aqueous humor from flowing through the pupil into the anterior
chamber. Accumulation of fluid in the posterior chamber presses on the iris causing it to
bulge outward and block the drainage angle completely. Acute angle-closure glaucoma is
a medical emergency and requires immediate attention.

77 comments

  1. Please check out. 

    Dr. Nils Loewen on Success with Trabectome 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDfwukIULvI

    Director of Glaucoma at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), Nils Loewen, MD, PhD, specializes in providing glaucoma procedures that are bleb-free. 

    Discover for yourself how one of the world's leading Trabectome surgeons gets such consistently good outcomes from this Micro Incisional Glaucoma Surgery. Dr. Loewen gets great results using Trabectome surgery (he hasn't done a Trabeculectomy in 3.5 years and only occasionally does tube shunts), but it wasn't always the case. Learn how Dr. Loewen modified his technique to become such an effective Trabectome Surgeon. 

    If you're an ophthalmic surgeon, you owe it to yourself and your patients to watch this presentation.

  2. insensible comments …..

    it is a great video ,for educational purpose..its too long and hard in my ophthalmology books

  3. This video makes it easier 2 understand Glaucoma especially for partners and families of the sufferer. I've had so much grief from my neighbours because my eyes look fairly normal at the front my neighbours have been extremely unpleasant saying they don't believe me that I'm blind!!! It's even more upsetting now I've lost all of my sight. They are all so ignorant and even though I've shown them my certificates of blindness they still don't believe me. Has anyone else had a similar experience please. Thanks to Amanda for subscribing to my You tube blog. Good luck to all and stay strong regards Kazzy

  4. Thank you! For so long I've always been getting confused about whether mydriasis or miosis is the one that causes narrow-angle glaucoma and ended up always being 50/50 on exams. Now I'm sure of it.

  5. Very good video, just one point, animation makes it look like aqueous humour flows through lens, it actually flows around the lens, and around the pupil area.
    Thanks for great explanation anyway

  6. Great video! I've been reading about open and closed angle glaucomas but your video (the graphic and explanations) made it click. Thank you so much!

  7. Best treatment for glaucoma

    Athwal Eye care provides medication, laser therapy and surgery for the Glaucoma.Medicated eye drops are the most common way to treat glaucoma. These medications lower your eye pressure either by slowing the production of aqueous humor or by increasing its outflow from the eye.For laser therapy a laser treatment called selective laser trabeculoplasty, (SLT), is often used to treat glaucoma.Surgery is another way of treatment.

  8. I have glaucoma open angle ! Just noticed 2 days ago ! I am extremely scared. The medication starts from now that I am in 20s.

  9. I now understand why I need to take eye drops for glaucoma. More likely to use the drops consistently b/c of this video.

  10. Thank you for watching! Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AlilaMedical for instant notification of our new videos!

  11. I'm thirteen and have glaucoma I discovered it today, I went to the eye doctor because I couldn't see from far away I'm really scared

  12. Had this when I was a teenager. I told my dad about it, and he just said to put a cold towel over them eyes. Very uncomfortable. Feels like the eyes are about to pop

  13. wow thank you dr for this video i have narrow or open angles and i have amblyopia and i have a congentital cateract on my right eye and over the years my good left eye is not as good as it use to be and im scared i dont want too loose my eyes now im having new problems with my eeyes im seeing black dots and black spots falling in my eyes. i dont want too loose my eye sight.

  14. thank you so much! i had a hard time understanding what was happening while reading the book and this video really helped me a lot!

  15. If this video is helpful to you, please consider help us make more videos like this! Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: https://www.patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia
    Thank you so much!

  16. My optometrist thinks I have glaucoma. The one thing in my eye ( can’t remember it’s name) is 20% bigger than the thing in my left eye.

  17. I think I have glaucoma. I have to go in for an appointment hopefully I don't. If I do then at least I can get treated but this is serious.

  18. I’m 18 and think I’m starting to develop this. My grandpa had it too. My vision will become vaguely blurry and I have minor sharp eye pains. When I feel my eye during these pains it’s like my eye ball is twitching and contracting but not a lot. Is this glaucoma?

  19. serious question out of curiosity – can your eye actually…not "explode" but…"explode" from the excess pressure? I guess it would probably more disintegrate or rupture

  20. I have a question because I am not sure what to do when the time comes, my dog had glaucoma in both eyes, one eye has been removed because it was too late before we noticed and it was causing him severe pain, the other eye is being medicated and has been stable for about two years now, the dog is 13-14 years old and other than his eye and some mysterious tumor in his mouth is in good health (no joint problems, dementia, severe gingivitis, or weight problems) inevitably when the condition of his eye becomes bad enough to cause severe pain again we are planning to put him to sleep because the dog would be elderly, in pain and the vet bills are high and also because if the mysterious black tumor in his mouth turns out to be cancer there is no point in spending thousands of dollars. but other than these issues he is in totally great shape. now I have seen dogs before where the owner had obviously neglected treatment for their dog with glaucoma and the dog despite having a huge unsightly bulging cloudy eye exploding out of its head seemed totally happy and full of energy, what if we were to do the same thing and just do nothing if the eye drops stopped working? how long does it take for the pain to go away? is it better to just leave the eye and let him be in pain for a few months and then let him live the rest of his life happily or it is better to put him to sleep??

  21. I have Glaucoma (open angle) in my right eye due from old eye injury when I was 9, now currently have implant, currently j cannot due due stupid Canada law limited is 2 years. Which is bull, people nowadays with sexual assault can go back many years, and what kind injury does sexual assault get? I think eyes more important. And law need to be changed, 2 years for personal injury is WRONG!

  22. I think there are more people suffering from glaucoma and other eye diseases as anything else in this world….not even HIV. ….just saying….

  23. thank you for this detailed information I just learned yesterday and I have glaucoma and I'm doing my own research on how to care for my eye or eyes not sure how long it will take before I go blind and what are the therapies to prevent that your information was vitally important for me since the doctor was unable to explain it to me like you have thank you so much

  24. Ur saying open angle is chronic type (chronic itseems for longer period of time) then hw partial blockage of drainage cannel it should be the comp blockage na so it will be irreversible nd permanent loss of vision

  25. I have glaucoma myself and I'm 24. I'm on for eye drops for my eye pressures 2 be controlled. I have to see my glaucoma doctor every 4 months to make sure everything is okay. I have had almost every glaucoma test and I have experienced this condition through part of my life. Glaucoma for me is not that bad it's just challenging because I have to make sure that I don't run out of my eye drops because then my pressure will go up. I can tell anyone with glaucoma that your attitude determines how bad you want your glaucoma to ruin your life. I choose to have a positive attitude towards living with glaucoma and helping other people with it.

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